TCBCC  
Canal Scene At Keaton Beach, Florida
DEPARTMENT OF
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

591 East US Highway 27
Perry, Florida   32347

Director: Steve Spradley

Coordinator: Kristy Anderson

Office: 850-838-3575
Fax: 850-838-3523

Taylor County - Family Disaster Planning

 

2013 Guide

 

 

Custom URLs have been created as follows:

 

 

 

Adult:

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=teen&lesson=flood

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=teen&lesson=lightning

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=teen&lesson=heatwave

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=teen&lesson=hurricane

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=teen&lesson=tornado

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=teen&lesson=winter

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=teen&lesson=ripcurrent

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=teen&lesson=tsunami

 

Children:

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=elementary&lesson=flood

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=elementary&lesson=lightning

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=elementary&lesson=heatwave

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=elementary&lesson=hurricane

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=elementary&lesson=tornado

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=elementary&lesson=winter

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=elementary&lesson=ripcurrent

 

https://www.meted.ucar.edu/emgmt/wxreadynation/launch.htm?course=elementary&lesson=tsunami

 

 

Ready: Prepare. Plan. Stay Informed.

Make a Plan

Your family may not be together when a disaster strikes so it is important to plan in advance: how you will get to a safe place; how you will contact one another; how you will get back together; and what you will do in different situations.

Ready.gov has made it simple for you to make a family emergency plan. Download the Family Communication Plan for Parents and Kids (PDF) and fill out the sections before printing it or emailing it to your family and friends.

You should also inquire about emergency plans at places where your family spends time: work, daycare and school, faith organizations, sports events and commuting. If no plans exist, consider volunteering to help create one. Talk to community leaders, your colleagues, neighbors and members of faith or civic organizations about how you can work together in the event of an emergency. You will be better prepared to safely reunite your family and loved ones during an emergency if you think ahead and communicate with others in advance. Read more about school and workplace plans.

Have a plan for traveling between work and home, and other commonly visited locations, in case of an emergency. Download the Commuter Emergency Plan

BUILD A KIT

A disaster supplies kit is simply a collection of basic items your household may need in the event of an emergency.

Try to assemble your kit well in advance of an emergency. You may have to evacuate at a moment’s notice and take essentials with you. You will probably not have time to search for the supplies you need or shop for them.

You may need to survive on your own after an emergency. This means having your own food, water and other supplies in sufficient quantity to last for at least 72 hours. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster but they cannot reach everyone immediately. You could get help in hours or it might take days.

Additionally, basic services such as electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment and telephones may be cut off for days or even a week, or longer. Your supplies kit should contain items to help you manage during these outages.

PREPARE FOR A HURRICANE

To prepare for a hurricane, you should take the following measures:

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Know your surroundings.
  • Learn the elevation level of your property and whether the land is flood-prone. This will help you know how your property will be affected when storm surge or tidal flooding are forecasted.
  • Learn community hurricane evacuation routes and how to find higher ground. Determine where you would go and how you would get there if you needed to evacuate.
  • Make plans to secure your property:
  • Cover all of your home’s windows. Permanent storm shutters offer the best protection for windows. A second option is to board up windows with 5/8” exterior grade or marine plywood, cut to fit and ready to install. Another year-round option would be installation of laminated glass with impact-resistant glazing. Tape does not prevent windows from breaking.
  • Install straps or additional clips to securely fasten your roof to the frame structure. This will reduce roof damage.
  • Be sure trees and shrubs around your home are well trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
  • Clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.
  • Reinforce your garage doors; if wind enters a garage it can cause dangerous and expensive structural damage.
  • Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
  • Determine how and where to secure your boat.
  • Install a generator for emergencies.
  • If in a high-rise building, when high winds are present, be prepared to take shelter on a lower floor because wind conditions increase with height, and in a small interior room without windows. When flooding may be occuring, be prepared to take shelter on a floor safely above the flooding and wave effects.
  • Consider building a safe room.

Hurricanes cause heavy rains that can cause extensive flood damage in coastal and inland areas. Everyone is at risk and should consider flood insurance protection. Flood insurance is the only way to financially protect your property or business from flood damage. To learn more about your flooding risk and how to protect yourself and your business, visit the Federal Insurance and Mitigation Administration (NFIP) Web site,www.floodsmart.gov or call 1-800-427-2419.

 

Visit the Be Ready Florida Website

 

Florida’s Division of Emergency Management has partnered with Volunteer Florida and the Be Ready Alliance Coordinating For Emergencies (BRACE) in an effort to engage homeowners throughout the state to take the time to prepare their home for the next disaster by participating in a series of informative workshops.

These workshops are designed to provide homeowners with the knowledge and skills to assist them in mitigating future disaster caused damage to their most valuable asset, the home they live in.

What Does Mitigation Mean? According to FEMA mitigation is the effort to reduce property damage and loss of life by lessening the impact of future disasters. Most Floridian’s mitigate property damage and the loss of life due to a residential fire by having a simple device known as a Smoke Alarm placed throughout their home.

The Be Ready Florida initiative takes mitigation to the next level by providing the knowledge homeowners need to mitigate the effects of hurricanes, floods, wildfires and the other disaster that threaten Floridians throughout the year.

 

AFTER THE DISASTER 

You can learn more about applying for federal disaster assitance by linking to http://www.disasterassistance.gov/